Teamwork is Critical in DCS Projects

No matter how well you have planned, always leave some slack in your schedule. You may get off to a great start, but problems invariably surface.

No matter how well you have planned, always leave some slack in your schedule. You may get off to a great start, but problems invariably surface.

The fastest way to confuse a project is to have too many disjointed teams. DCS projects are extremely complicated and all the groups have to interact. Even if you don't have anything new to share, schedule a weekly call so everyone knows what everyone else is doing.

If you’ve found a solution to a problem, one of your other team members may run into the same issue. Instead of wasting precious time, they'll know to call you. Keep the calls short and sweet, but make sure everyone provides a good synopsis.

If you are not a people person, make sure you get someone on your team who can talk to people. Otherwise, people will hide their issues. Most importantly, do not shoot the messenger. If someone comes to you with an issue, handle it, but do so in a way that they will bring you other issues. If everything is a disaster, no one is going to tell you anything until it is too late to handle calmly (and cheaply).

As long as you have a competent team and are using a good product, you have the basis for a successful project. A successful, on-time and on-budget installation depends on whether or not the team works well together.

 

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